Virginia Tech™home

Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

Undergraduate Linear Algebra class

For Math Majors:

To enroll in MATH 1225, you must be designated as MATH 1225 - Ready.  

 

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant intercultural and global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for science and engineering. 1225: limits, continuity, differentiation, transcendental functions, applications of differentiation, introduction to integration.  A student can earn credit for at most one of 1525 and 1225. (4H,4C)

For more information, visit the

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant intercultural and global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for science and engineering. 1226: techniques and applications of integration, trapezoidal and Simpson’s rules, improper integrals, sequences and series, power series, parametric curves and polar coordinates, software-based techniques. A student can earn credit for at most 1026 and 1226. (4H,4C)

For more information, visit the

For Non-Majors

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques and applications of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for the life sciences. Differential calculus, graphing, applications for the life sciences, use of spreadsheet software. Assumes 2 units of high school algebra, 1 unit of geometry, 1/2 unit of trigonometry and precalculus. student can earn credit for at most one of 1025 and 1225.  (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques and applications of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for the life sciences. Integral calculus, numerical techniques, elementary differential equations, applications for the life sciences, use of spreadsheet and scientific software. A student can earn credit for at most one of 1026 and 1226. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Vector and matrix algebra systems of linear equations, linear equations, linear independence, bases, orthonormal bases, rank, linear transformations, diagonalization, implementation with contemporary software. Math 1226 or a grade of at least B in VT MATH 1225. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2114H and 2405H. Pre: 1225 or 1226. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Calculus for functions for several variables. Planes and surfaces, continuity, differentiation, chain rule, extreme values, Lagrange multipliers, double and triple integrals and applications, software-based techniques. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2204 and 2406H. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2024 and 2204. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2204 and CMDA 2005. Pre: 1226. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Unified course in ordinary differential equations. First-order equations, second-and-higher-order constant coefficient linear equations, systems of first-order linear equations, and numerical methods. Mathematical models describing motion and cooling, predator-prey population models, SIR-models, mechanical vibrations, electric circuits, rates of chemical reactions, radioactive decay. Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant intercultural and global issues. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2214 and 2406H. A student can earn credit for at most one of 2214 and CMDA 2006. Pre: 1114 or 2114 or 2114H or 2405H, 1226. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Mathematics in a Computational Context provides an integrated treatment of linear algebra, differential equations, and multivariable calculus. Students learn to distinguish between problems that can be solved “by hand” and those requiring approximation to specified accuracy. Students learn analytical methods as well as algorithms and their efficient implementation on a computer. This course provides an introduction to the mathematics and computation commonly encountered in today’s scientific and engineering workplaces.

The course is designated as an honors section, though it is not restricted to honors students.

Precalculus college algebra, basic functions (algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric), conic sections, graphing techniques, basic probability. Usage of mathematical models, analytical calculations, and graphical or numerical representations of data to analyze problems from multiple disciplines that address intercultural and global challenges in areas such as chemistry, environmental science, the life sciences, finance, and statistics. Use of spreadsheet software. Two units of high school algebra and one of plane geometry are required. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

 

There are several ways to earn credit for MATH 1014 (Precalculus) at Virginia Tech. Students are encouraged to discuss their options with their academic advisors.

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques and applications of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for the life sciences. Differential calculus, graphing, applications for the life sciences, use of spreadsheet software. Assumes 2 units of high school algebra, 1 unit of geometry, 1/2 unit of trigonometry and precalculus. student can earn credit for at most one of 1025 and 1225.  (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Quantitative and computational thinking to address relevant global issues. Unified calculus course covering techniques and applications of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Constitutes the standard first-year mathematics courses for the life sciences. Integral calculus, numerical techniques, elementary differential equations, applications for the life sciences, use of spreadsheet and scientific software. A student can earn credit for at most one of 1026 and 1226. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Differential calculus techniques for functions of one and two variables. Emphasis on graphs, rates of change, and optimization of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logistic functions. Terminology and applications for business, including spreadsheet software. Mathematical models of real-world business problems, including discrete and continuous models, that address intercultural and global challenges in such areas as finance, marketing, and accounting. Assumes 2 units of high school algebra and 1 unit of geometry. (4H,4C)

For more information, visit the 

A standard first-year mathematics sequence for architecture majors. Mathematical models of real-world problems, including discrete and continuous models, that address relevant global challenges in such areas as urban planning, building construction, and home design. Euclidean geometry, trigonometry, sequences and the golden ratio, graph theory, tilings, polygons and polyhedra, applications for 2- and 3-dimensional design and construction, use of geometric software. Assumes 2 units of high school algebra and 1 unit of high school geometry. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

A standard first-year mathematics sequence for architecture majors. Mathematical models of real-world problems, including discrete and continuous models, that address relevant global challenges in such areas as urban planning, building construction, and home design. Vectors in the plane and space, descriptive and projective geometry, differential and integral calculus, applications for 2- and 3-dimensional design and construction, including areas, volumes, centroids, and optimization. Assumes 2 units of high school algebra and 1 unit of high school geometry. (3H,3C)

For more information, visit the

Euclidean vectors, complex numbers, and topics in linear algebra including linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, and bases in Euclidean space. This course, along with 1205-1206 and 1224, constitutes the freshman science and engineering mathematics courses. 2 units of high school algebra, 1 unit of geometry, 1/2 unit each of trigonometry and pre-calculus required. A student cannot earn credit for 1114 if taken after earning credit for 2114. (2H,2C)

For more information, visit the

For current offerings of all math classes:

For information on math classes not listed: